Working with found objects, pages from old books, and dime-store trinkets, self-taught artist Joseph Cornell (1903–1972) transformed everyday materials into extraordinary universes. By collecting and carefully juxtaposing his treasures in small, glass-front boxes, this pioneering artist invented visual poems exploring themes as varied as the night sky, the romantic ballet, glamorous movie stars, and bird habitats.

Joseph Cornell's life, his sources of artistic inspiration, and his intriguing boxes are presented in beautifully collaged spreads in this 80-page book. The book's design, inspired by Cornell's boxes, collages, and letters, tells his story in both words and images.


A project section aims to inspire the reader to create their own box assemblages. Ideas and materials are suggested for six boxes, including habitat boxes, game boxes, and museum boxes, all based on significant themes in Cornell's work.


Also included are fun materials to get the creative process started—five sheets for collaging, a ready-to-assemble miniature box, a magnifying lens, colored plastic, and printed game pieces—all housed in a sturdy hinged box with a removable grid.


The perfect book to give someone who is just starting to become interested in collecting and assemblage work and would appreciate guidance.

$29.95 (CAN $34.99)
Available in bookstores at Amazon or IndieBound.

Tags: Box, Cornell, Found, Joseph, Magical, Objects, The, Worlds, book, crafthaus

Views: 221

Replies to This Discussion

The project section of this book is a "Paint-by-numbers" collage. It makes me very uncomfortable when it is suggested that the maker will be making original artwork or learning about the collage of Joseph Cornell with a sticker sheet.

Yes, I understand that this is just to make the book more inviting.It is a sales tool and nothing more.

Any thoughts?

Harriete


 

When it comes to getting introduced to new ideas, sights and thoughts many people need a lot more hand holding than most of us with an art background expect. We come to this naturally because we are driven to make since before birth, but I have often observed that non-creative types who are open to learning new things need a lot of guidance, talking to, and step-by-step instructions to feel secure enough in creating anything at all. Remember the experience economy PDS we did, Harriete, about the wonderful jeweler who took her beading classes to clients' campuses? Same thing as this box, really.

In my opinion, the art/craft world has often left interested laypeople feeling inferior and stupid when it comes to our work which is counter-productive and arrogant. Hobbyists derive pleasure from the act of making. What's so wrong with that? Making/creating anything is better than not creating at all and sitting on the sofa, sucking bon-bons, and watching re-runs of Friends all the time (don't get me wrong, I loved that show). Getting an introduction to a craft form in a non-threatening manner is much more preferable in my mind than standing in a corner feeling unworthy because the outside world tells you you are nothing but a dabbler.

Whatever happened to the craft world being inclusive, helpful and supportive? I think this book is in the 'supportive' category. At the very least we might end up with someone who added a new craft experience to their lexicon. With craft in middle and high schools (and some universities) being the sad state of affairs that they are, anything to help people get into the mood for creating is good. As I said, some just need more help than others.

BTW: Nowhere did I see the claim made here that a person making something from this kit creates original artwork - but they indeed do learn something about the artist and the work, I think that is undeniable.

I want to add that in a weird twist of irony Joseph Cornell was self-taught too - which goes to show that everybody has to start somewhere and there's no telling where things can lead once your hands are covered in glue. :-)

Yes, I understand and agree with what you are saying...but would prefer they suggest cutting out images from books or magazines.....(a la Joseph Cornel) rather than offer pre-printed stickers.

It is the stickers that make me concerned, not the book or project.

Harriete

We doubt the estate of Joseph Cornel is overly concerned about a flood of Cornel forgeries or stylistic rippoffs flooding the market. This kit is clearly aimed at the non-artist, non-creative thinker.

Why indeed have a set of predefined stickers? So that the user can easily achieve a predetermined and acceptable result without all the skills, we as trained artists apply innately. Compositional narrative being chief among them.  This kit is the very essence of inclusion with built-in positive reinforcement of the user's effort.

As professional artists we are not in the slightest concerned that the positive experience of anyone playing with this kit will in any way diminish our stature or ability to earn income. We do see great potential for a Harriet Estel Berman printed tin bracelet kit though.

Funny from 2 Roses. You must be great company at dinner.

Harriete

I felt the same way about the collage sheets Harriet! There are similar sheets for sale at Michael's...I've never seen Joseph's Cornell's work but I've heard it often referenced.  Perhaps this book is geared to teenagers, it has all the elements to appeal to that age set.  

RSS

Latest Activity

The Justified Sinner commented on The Justified Sinner's blog post Long Winter Nights
"Thank you, Brigitte!"
43 minutes ago
Brigitte Martin commented on The Justified Sinner's blog post Long Winter Nights
"Happy - belated - birthday!"
6 hours ago
Philip W Ambrose liked Marissa Saneholtz's photo
8 hours ago
Sarah EK Muse posted a photo

Take Home a Piece of Virginia

This Holiday SeasonTake Home a Piece of VirginiaAn ExperienceA MemoryA SkillArtisansCenterofVirginia.org
13 hours ago
Vincent Pontillo is now friends with Frederique Coomans and Marissa Guthrie
14 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"ResonanceFM BroadcastsMaking Conversations is a series that originally aired on Resonance104.4fm.Episode 1: Professor Andrew Prescott, AHRC Digital Transformations Research Fellow, talks to Jon Rogers and Justin Marshall about how using digital…"
17 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
17 hours ago
Gigi Li is now a member of crafthaus
17 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"At the Bench http://www.atthebench.com/subscribe/ Andrew is off filming for a few days this week. He is filming one of UK's best loved precious metal recycling companies. Still a bit hush hush at the moment but an interested collection of films…"
17 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"Head of School - Conservation West Dean College Location: Chichester Salary: Circa £47,000 Hours: Full Time Contract Type: Permanent Placed on: 19th November 2014 Closes: 12th December 2014 Part of The Edward James Foundation Ltd, a registered…"
18 hours ago
The Justified Sinner posted a blog post

Long Winter Nights

An eventful week which included my 50th birthday! I've been in Edinburgh again for a couple of events, taking in the current show of work by the Northern Irish family of Silversmiths "The McCrory Family" as well as Tania Clarke Hall's incredible jewellery made from leather. My main reason for visiting was to pick up my brooch by Dorothy Hogg from The…See More
19 hours ago
Alena Stukavcova Dolezalova liked Stefano Pedonesi's photo
yesterday

© 2014   Created by Brigitte Martin.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service