Today was the first working day of “Jewelry Fabrication in Steel” with Sharon Massey. It started off with another wonderful breakfast (the food here is amazing!) before our group headed to the metals studio. Sharon began with demonstrating how to solder multiple gauges of steel wire (she makes it look so easy!). I made a few really quick sample pieces as she suggested, and I admit my first attempts were not very good. In order to experiment to find the method that worked best for me, I started a brooch which I purposefully made more ornamental than my past work to foster that experimentation. By the time I got the first part of the brooch completed (after multiple attempts of course), I began to get it!

Sharon then showed me how to solder steel sheet. I was surprised by how easy it was to saw through, at least in 22 gauge. I admit I found soldering sheet steel easier than soldering the wire. As a wire fanatic, I enjoy the aesthetic of the wire more, but I was much more successful with soldering sheet on the first try. In fact, Sharon explained that I could hold the piece in the air with my tweezers and solder it from underneath (it was a rather small piece, roughly 2”). When it flowed like a dream, I had to seriously question why I had not worked with steel before.


The discoveries did not stop there. Sharon had mentioned a few different techniques (some of which we will learn on Sunday) to alter the appearance/surface of steel. Today we learned etching with ferric chloride (available at Radioshack). She also mentioned products such as “Press and Peel Blue” but that the ferric chloride is a good etchant that requires neither a fancy printer, nor does it undercut the etching. I had never done etching before, so the process was completely new to me. As a resist, we used Sharpie Paint Pens and let the marks dry for a good 30 minutes or so to ensure solid adhesion. Sharon then showed us how to suspend the steel in the chloride using tape. After roughly 1.5 hours, we removed the metal pieces (wearing gloves—ferric chloride stains hands and clothes), rinsed them in water, and then dipped them in an ammonia bath to completely diffuse the ferric chloride.

For such a simple process, etching gets beautiful results! I have done roller printing/embossing, but never gotten such a crisp and even image through that method. I have a piece at home that I had been mulling over how to liven it up; now I will be visiting my local electronics supply store.  

The night finished off with a return trip to the studio for open studio hours before the class headed down to the campfire. It was a great way to end the evening.

 

Views: 47

Latest Activity

Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"Don't delay! December 20th is the deadline for SNAG's 2020 Adorned Spaces.   The 2020 SNAG Philadelphia conference is seeking curators, organizations, schools, and individuals to offer a fresh look at the field of contemporary…"
Sunday
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"The Festive Season is rapidly approaching! If you are looking for an early Christmas present for a loved one or to treat yourself then we still have three spaces available on our course for beginners in Manchester (14/15 December 2019.) For…"
Sunday
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
Sunday
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"Classes are returning to MAKING SPACE We're looking to relaunch a programme of 5 and 10 week courses from April 2020, so we'd love to hear from tutors who would be interested in leading these sessions. The courses will be demand-led, so…"
Sunday

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

© 2019   Created by Brigitte Martin.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service