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Velvet da Vinci

Since 1991, Velvet da Vinci has been a leader in showcasing new developments in contemporary art jewelry and craft-based sculpture and regularly organizes exhibitions of contemporary craft.

Website: http://www.velvetdavinci.com
Location: 2015 Polk Street @ Broadway, San Francisco, CA 94109
Members: 162
Latest Activity: Jan 10, 2015

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Comment by Deborrah Daher on June 10, 2010 at 5:40pm
Thomas Hill's work looks wonderful - please publish more pictures as you get them. Congrats to all!
Comment by Mike Holmes on June 10, 2010 at 4:41pm
OPENING TONIGHT at San Francisco Museum of Craft and Design: Velvet da Vinci's Thomas Hill


FOURSITE: 4 Materials | 4 Artists | 4 Sites
Artists Tanya Aguiñiga, Paul Hayes, Tom Hill, and Christine Lee


Tom will be performing duet sonatas for Baroque Bassoon tonight at 7:00


Tom Hill's terrific forrest installation is one of four environments on display now through September 18 at SFMCD.


Visit SFMCD's website for details:
http://www.sfmcd.org/exhibt_current.htm

Comment by Mike Holmes on May 11, 2010 at 2:41pm
BORIS BALLY + SETH PAPAC
Velvet da Vinci

May 1 to June 14, 2010
Artists’ reception Friday, May 7, 6 to 8 p.m.


Velvet da Vinci in San Francisco presents new work by Boris Bally + Seth Papac. Known for his use of recycled street signs, Boris Bally's award-winning work is both witty and innovative, employing the use of jeweler’s skills on non-precious materials. His work for this show is titled deSIGN and includes both functional furniture and wearable jewelry. deSIGN reflects the original use of his materials and emphasizes its transformation. Seth Papac, a recent graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art's MFA program, utilizes the modularity of his jewelry to interact with the body of the wearer. He uses both precious and non-precious metals, enamel, and recycled objects in his work. This show opens May 1, 2010 with an artists’ reception on Friday, May 7, from 6 to 8 p.m.


Boris Bally transforms recycled street signs, weapon parts, and a wide variety of found materials into objects for reflection. He rivets and forms the hand-selected signs, which he purchases from cities. These pieces celebrate raw American street-aesthetic in the form of objects, often useful, for the home and the body.

Bally works out of Providence, Rhode Island and is the recipient of the 2006 Individual Achievement Award for the Visual Arts presented by the Arts & Business Council of Rhode Island. Bally received his BFA in Metals at Carnegie Mellon University in 1984, and has since received two Rhode Island Council on the Arts Fellowships in Design and a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship in Craft. His work has been featured in numerous international exhibitions and publications. Public collections include London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, London, Museum of Art & Design, New York, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburg, Brooklyn Museum, Renwick Gallery, Washington D.C. and Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, New York.


Seth Papac’s fascination with 17th century European parures, a matching jewelry set comprised of modular components, influences his current work. Papac’s work transforms and disassembles from one piece into another; necklaces become bracelets and earrings, chatelaines contain removable necklaces and objects. His broad range of materials, from traditional metal and enamel to found objects, wood, string, and leather, become narrative works of wearable jewelry or objects.

Public collections include Cranbrook Art Museum, Michigan, Tacoma Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, The Rotasa Foundation, California, Marilyn Werby Rabinovitch Collection, and University of Washington, Seattle.

Seth Papac Artist Statement:
My interest in jewelry as a medium of art is its site – the body. Much as the function of architecture is to house, display and protect paintings and sculpture, the body acts as literal, metaphorical and conceptual structure for jewelry. Placed on this site, jewelry acts as a personal signifier of taste, attitude, belief and history.

The formal and compositional focus is targeted at an investigation and interpretation of parures, a term from Old French for a set of various items of matching jewelry, which rose to popularity in early 17th century Europe. Cleverly the parure was modular and could be disassembled into different parts or easily remade to stay fashionable. An inherent narrative is created through this interchangeability.

Boris Bally's wall of platters and Broadway and Transit chairs at Velvet da Vinci

Seth Papac
Necklace with removable necklace and objects, whitesteelcement
Sterling silver, enameled steel, stainless steel, steel, poplar, cement, paint
64cm x 43cm x 7cm


Boris Bally
Stool, Flow
Re-used traffic signs, champagne corks, steel hardware
126cm x 75.6cm x 71.1cm
Comment by Deborrah Daher on March 28, 2010 at 8:29am
Glad to find you here - saw the space some years ago and liked it's directness.
Comment by Ethical Metalsmiths on February 23, 2010 at 9:42am
Hi Mike,

Ethical Metalsmiths is getting with the social networking program. Thanks for all of your support over the last several years!

Christina
Comment by linnie mclarty on February 16, 2010 at 6:00pm
Very happy to be part of this group.
Comment by Hratch Babikian on February 2, 2010 at 10:43pm
hello Mike and Elizabeth
Comment by ute decker on January 27, 2010 at 6:15pm
what a joyous smile what a delightful gallery!
with greetings from london
Comment by Thea Clark on January 27, 2010 at 10:53am
I look forward to getting back to SF to see your"new" space.
Comment by 2Roses on January 26, 2010 at 1:08am
Glad to see Velvet Da Vinci in the Haus. We look forward to your perspectives on art and artists
 

Members (140)

 
 
 

2016 Crafthaus Project Grant

Every other year, crafthaus awards a micro grant to a craft artist regardless of their location, professional background, or chosen craft field.

2016 Submission period

September 6 - 30, 2016.

Eligibility and additional information: https://is.gd/qhlXfz

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Latest Activity

Brigitte Martin posted blog posts
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Brigitte Martin posted photos
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Brigitte Martin liked Harriete Estel Berman's blog post Exhibition Issues Both Good and Bad Solutions
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Crafthaus Project Grant 2016

Every other year, crafthaus awards a micro grant to a craft artist regardless of their location, professional background, or chosen craft field.The grant is unrestricted and intended to provide assistance for an interesting new personal or group…See More
12 hours ago
Harriete Estel Berman commented on Harriete Estel Berman's blog post Exhibition Issues Both Good and Bad Solutions
"Thanks to 2Roses for your comment. I don't have any mannequins, but will  have to start looking.  "
15 hours ago
2Roses commented on Harriete Estel Berman's blog post Exhibition Issues Both Good and Bad Solutions
"Harriete, thank you for sharing your journey on this aspect of the field.  Display and photography are so vitally important to furthering a professional career in the arts. It would have been easy to have simply laid the bracelets on a stand,…"
16 hours ago
Harriete Estel Berman posted photos
17 hours ago
Sher Novak liked Brigitte Martin's group Crafthaus goes to ... ACC Baltimore 2016
22 hours ago

Masthead Credits

Karen Lester,Warwickshire, UK

Brooch, Fluidity Series.

Cast bone china, glaze, slip, silver.

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