Porcelain set of 2 mugs and 1 bowl, salt fired

5"

Dec. 2012

Views: 21

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Comment by Duncan Blount on January 26, 2013 at 1:19pm

Artist Statement for this piece:

Our skin attaches us and holds us in. In many ways, skin defines us: young or old, black or white, all skin commands beauty. In the delicate swirl of white and orange, I tried to capture the essence of nakedness. What twirling, blurred, freckled, memories do each of us hold when we think of skin? This porcelain is unclothed; glazed by only the heat and salt of the kiln. The curvature of the mugs and bowl resemble various body-like bends, a feeling compounded by the handles which reach out to the viewer, softly requesting to be held. The dark blush that builds throughout the set signals a romance motion, just as the mugs on either side create a visual tension, almost wishing to be pulled together.

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