At no time in history were costumes of greater importance than in the courtly world of the Baroque. They were meant to give the natural human figure imposing dimensions by turning them into walking sculptures using hooped skirts, padded bustles, and brocade clothes. Such accessories constrained all movement to basic regular forms, which in turn served as functional correspondences to courtly ceremonies.

The costumes by Gwen van den Eijnde (*1981) recall many aspects of the forms of Baroque costumes. Van den Eijnde, who was born in the Netherlands and lives in Paris, has developed a specific form of performance that situates itself between haute couture, design, craftsmanship, and sculpture. Drawing inspiration from contemporaneous pattern books, from films such as Jarman’s “Caravaggio” or Fellini’s “Casanova,” he meshes these influences into an individual style.

The costumes themselves are the result of a deliberate manufacturing process that begins with small design models and culminates in the completed costumes made using exceptional, and frequently highly valuable, materials. However, the artwork itself only finds completion in the artist’s performance: Van den Eijnde stages his compositions as if for a theater stage or the catwalk. Neither mime nor content are of importance, only the costumes and the frequently absurd outgrowths determine these performances.

This is also the case in the exhibition Isabel Halene curated at the Kunstraum Riehen that includes pattern collages and costume designs along with a video recording of van den Eijnde’s three-part performance staged during the Basel Museum Night. The shimmering clothes testify to what took place: “Le Lion habillé en fleur,” “Pam-Pam,” and “L’obélisque.” The poetic titles open imaginary spaces that evoke in us the desire to step out of ourselves and be absorbed into these imaginary forms. Anybody interested in the possible metamorphoses of collar plissés, silk chiffons, or head cages should not miss this subtly presented exhibition.


Durch das Pfauenauge, Gwen van den Eijnde. Kunstraum Riehen. Until 24th February 2013.

Maria Becker
Neue Zürcher Zeitung, Samstag, 9. Februar 2013 . Nr.33

SOURCE: http://www.gvde.net/




Views: 200

Tags: Eijnde, Gwen, art, clothes, costume, crafthaus, den, fabric, fashion, head, More…shoes, van

Comment

You need to be a member of crafthaus to add comments!

Join crafthaus

Comment by chesley williams on January 21, 2014 at 4:57pm

So in love!

Comment by Margarita Sampson on January 17, 2014 at 5:36pm

LOVE!!!!!!

2014 Crafthaus Project Grant Recipient

Crafthaus is pleased to announce that Leisa Rich's project "Invisible:VisAble" garnered 968 votes of 2,575 total votes cast (37.59%) and is the 2014 Crafthaus Project Grant Winner.

Starting in November, we all look forward to following Leisa's crafthaus blog about her project.

Thank you to everyone who voted. Much success for all projects!

View all voting results.

Latest Activity

Susan Lee Stephen shared Brigitte Martin's blog post on Facebook
22 minutes ago
Susan Lee Stephen liked Brigitte Martin's blog post The Frog Museum
23 minutes ago
Susan Lee Stephen shared Brigitte Martin's blog post on Facebook
38 minutes ago
Susan Lee Stephen liked Brigitte Martin's blog post The Wondrous World of Nelly Saunier: Gaultier’s Plumassière Extraordinaire
50 minutes ago
L. Sue Szabo commented on L. Sue Szabo's photo
Thumbnail

On the Boardwalk

"thanks stacy- that;s so nice of you to say!"
1 hour ago
Profile IconLora Hart, Stacy Haviland and 16 other members joined Mark Fenn - Studiofenn's group
Thumbnail

Tales From the Tool Box - Chapter One

Thank you for viewing this on-line exhibitionThis exhibition is a showcase for narrative work, with over 234 images it was decided that the exhibition would be in two parts with chapter two being on-line in January 2015I would like to personally thank all the makers who took the time to submit work for this on-line exhibition. Image left: Dauvit AlexanderTitle - "Blood Will Have Blood: A Macbeth Brooch" Image Credit: Photography by Andrew Neilson, Neilson Photography. See More
1 hour ago
Stacy Haviland commented on L. Sue Szabo's photo
Thumbnail

On the Boardwalk

"This piece is so beautiful. I look at it often."
2 hours ago
Stacy Haviland posted a status
"This group of artists are so inspiring! I was "swayed" by the beauty and personal messages of all the work"
2 hours ago
Emily Hickman liked Mark Fenn - Studiofenn's group Tales From the Tool Box - Chapter One
5 hours ago
Emily Hickman shared Mark Fenn - Studiofenn's group on Facebook
5 hours ago
Sophia Georgiopoulou joined Brigitte Martin's group
Thumbnail

Crafthaus Project Grant 2014

Every Fall, crafthaus awards a micro project grant to a crafthaus member regardless of location, professional background, or craft field. The grant is unrestricted and intended to provide assistance for a personal or group project.All projects will be published anonymously, without revealing any personal information about the submitting party.The crafthaus membership and the general public review all proposed projects and vote for the one they wish to see supported. One vote per person.Voting…See More
6 hours ago
Sophia Georgiopoulou joined Jivan Astfalck's group
Thumbnail

Instill - Material Matters 2014

  INSTILL-material matters “The year’s end is neither an end nor a beginning, but a going on, with all the wisdom that experience can instill in us.”  Hal Borland The School of Jewellery at Birmingham City University presents the thesis work by students of the MA in Jewellery, Silversmithing and Related Products course. The show celebrates the achievements of a group of exceptionally diverse individuals, with each piece on display offering an unexpected adventure through material that…See More
6 hours ago

A modern metalsmith/metal artist can be found working in traditional metals as well as in nontraditional materials. The designs can range from the classic to the extravagant, and the techniques can either be centuries old or decidedly current.

The wide range of expression preferences, design options, materials, and processes has lead within our field to unfavorable misconceptions, misunderstandings and in some cases even outright disdain between artists. Can the metal and jewelry field overcome its division and send out a much-needed signal?

We appreciate and respect our historical past and acknowledge that current materials have a rightful place in jewelry/object making!

DETAILS on exhibition premise, call for artists, submission guidelines.....

© 2014   Created by Brigitte Martin.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service