The Association for Contemporary Jewellery

Information

The Association for Contemporary Jewellery

The Association for Contemporary Jewellery is devoted to the promotion, representation, understanding and development of contemporary jewellery in the United Kingdom and abroad.

 

Website: http://www.acj.org.uk/
Location: UK
Members: 76
Latest Activity: 5 hours ago

The Association for Contemporary Jewellery

is devoted to the promotion, representation, understanding and development of contemporary jewellery in the United Kingdom and abroad.

Founded as a membership association in 1997 and registered as a Limited Company in 2006, it recognises a need to foster discussion, debate and critical review and interaction amongst its members. To this end we organise conferences, lectures, seminars, workshops and an annual general meeting for our members. Our regular newsletter, findings, features reviews, information, comment, book offers and discounts and is of benefit to both our members and the wider public. We also produce a monthly e-bulletin featuring news and opportunities.

We welcome as members practising jewellers, associated designers and crafts people, educators, students, gallery owners and retailers, museum curators, critics and collectors - indeed, anyone with an interest in contemporary jewellery.


The Association for Contemporary Jewellery 
PO Box 37807 London SE23 1XJ United Kingdom 
Telephone: + 00 44 (0)20 8291 4201 
Fax: + 00 44 (0)20 8291 4452 
Email: enquiries@acj.org.uk

 

WHAT WE DO

• promote greater understanding of contemporary jewellery
• support jewellers’ creative and professional development
• develop audiences for this lively field of contemporary craft and design

Discussion Forum

"Disbelief" over plans to remove crafts from UK creative industries_ Dezeen Magazine

Started by Vicky Saragouda. Last reply by Rebecca Skeels May 7, 2013. 3 Replies

Government proposals to remove crafts from its list of recognised creative industries have triggered "disbelief" and "frustration" in the sector...Article published by Dezeen Magazine on May 1st.www.dezeen.comContinue

Tags: Council, Crafts, industries, creative, Crafts

Comment Wall

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Comment by Rebecca Skeels 5 hours ago
so so so many exciting things to do http://www.londoncraftweek.com/programme?&&&&keys=&...
Comment by Rebecca Skeels 6 hours ago
Comment by Rebecca Skeels 6 hours ago
Comment by Rebecca Skeels 6 hours ago

The second Make Your Mark student event at Goldsmiths’ Hall proved a resounding success.

Held at Goldsmiths’ Hall over two days (Friday 17 and Saturday 18, April) more than 700 students attended. The two days were action-packed with a range of inspiring, relevant talks from leading figures in the industry, including top jeweller, Theo Fennell and Michael Wainwright, MD of Boodles who gave fascinating insights into how to keep your business personal as well as advice as to how to expand and grow in a tough, competitive world. In addition, 29 companies from across the trade, such as diamond and bullion dealers, tool suppliers and organisations including the Hand Engravers Association, had stands where they showcased products, gave demos and offered vital advice and career guidance. The event also provided the opportunity to explore Goldsmiths’ Hall and network in a very informal manner.

Dr Robert Organ, Deputy Warden of the Goldsmiths' Company Assay Office, commented: “We were delighted to be able to facilitate such a vital resource to the next generation of British jewellers and silversmiths. Make Your Mark is now firmly established as an annual event in the Goldsmiths’ Company Assay Office’s calendar.”

We would like to thank all staff, exhibitors, speakers and visitors for attending and hope you had a fantastic day and were inspired to develop your careers in the craft.

To find out more about our events, email:events@assayofficelondon.co.uk

Comment by Rebecca Skeels 6 hours ago
Don't miss this fantastic event, open to anyone with an interest in hallmarking or precious metals on Friday 22 May.

There will be an expert talk on the hallmarking process and history of our assay office, the oldest assay office in the UK, an exclusive tour of the Assay Office production floors and a chance to try hand-marking in the stunning surroundings of Goldsmiths' Hall.

You will also be treated to a 2-course lunch and invited to enter a competition to win a fantastic prize to take away!

Attendees will benefit from a greater understanding of the hallmarking process and law, as well as learning ways to use hallmarking as a marketing tool and to enhance reputation and brand - it's also a great way to network with a variety of individuals from the trade; from new designer-makers to established businesses.

Don't forget to bring an item or jewellery or silverware with you to be tested on our XRF machine!

Cost: £60 per person and by reservation only.

For more information or to book, email: alison.byne@assayofficelondon.co.uk or call: 020 7606 8971
Comment by Rebecca Skeels 6 hours ago
Comment by Rebecca Skeels 6 hours ago
Comment by Rebecca Skeels 6 hours ago
THE HERE AND NOW
Corinne Julius looks at jewellery at COLLECT
http://www.craftscouncil.org.uk/articles/the-here-and-now/?utm_sour...

Jewellery is and has always been a signifier of status, values and beliefs although, it is often assumed to be a demonstration of the wealth of the donor or buyer. It marks adolescence, marriage and widowhood; all since cave dwellers adorned themselves with feathers and seeds to announce difference and belonging.

In the 1970s, contemporary jewellers sought to move away from conventional notions of preciousness that were dependent on the use of valuable metals and gemstones, instead maintaining that the ideas and concepts behind their jewellery gave value and meaning. They considered themselves artists or makers, rather than skilled artisans; their work was redefined not as jewellery, but as wearable art.

Since its inception, the annual Crafts Council show COLLECT, has been a magnet for collectors, students, jewellers, teachers and many interested visitors. The exhibition has attracted international galleries and makers particularly from the Netherlands. ‘COLLECT has been pivotal in creating new contacts and collectors for many galleries,’ says Daniella Wells, the show’s director.

Although there are no official figures, ‘anecdotally,’ says Wells, ‘ceramics and jewellery seem to be the most popular disciplines at the fair. The focus of jewellery at COLLECT is for the work to be considered as an art object, we specifically term it art jewellery. So it’s reasonable to say that there is a leaning towards non-precious materials and more conceptual work. There is work in precious metals shown by such leaders as Giovanni Corvaja [Adrian Sassoon], but you’re more likely to find precious metals combined with non-precious, for example pieces such as Winfried Krüger’s [Galerie Marzee] oxidised silver, lead strapping, textile pendant.’

Marzee’s plan-chest, whose drawers house carefully arranged conceptual pieces by such artists as Dorothea Prühl, Junwon Jung, Otto Künzli, Rudolf Kocéa, Stefano Marchetti and Ute Eitzenhöfer have become a regular banquet for jewellery-holics. Fewer galleries will show jewellery alone; many exhibits will include art pieces by overseas makers.

And COLLECT will give visitors an in-depth historical understanding of the contemporary jewellery movement, with the preview of the Crafts Council’s new 2015 touring exhibition I AM HERE. Curated by the Crafts Council’s head of exhibitions and collections Annabelle Campbell with Lorna Burn, exhibition and collection project curator, I AM HERE will show selected jewellery from 1970s to the present day.

The show draws heavily on the Crafts Council’s Collection, started in 1972. Acquisitions for the Collection are selected by a panel of makers, curators and critics to give a snapshot of the pinnacles of making by UK-based practitioners. The selection criteria include recording significant developments in a maker’s practice, a specific time in craft practice and the documentation of trends and innovation in the materials, processes, skills and technologies of contemporary craft. It includes work by the most eminent of UK-based jewellers, especially those who have changed the course of British jewellery development, such as Wendy Ramshaw and David Watkins, Caroline Broadhead, Gerda Flöckinger, Naomi Filmer, David Poston, Elizabeth Callinicos and Dorothy Hogg.

For COLLECT, the I AM HERE preview will focus on the 1970s, the start of the studio jewellery movement, together with more recent pieces by UK and international makers, the latter via loans from Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (mima) with its outstanding contemporary collection, which includes work by Ted Noten, Gijs Bakker, Karl Fritsch, Otto Künzli and Felieke van der Leest, as well as loans from Galerie Marzee’s artists and the owner, Marie- José Van Den Hout’s personal collection. Campbell explains that the title is from a statement by the anthropologist Ted Polhemus in his 2007 essay commissioned by the Crafts Council for the Jerwood Applied Arts Prize: ‘Lost in an increasingly undifferentiated, homogenised global universe, we urgently need visual adjectives which proclaim ‘I am here’. Out of such visual meaning may… come connection.’

This is an excerpt taken from the Crafts Guide to COLLECT 2015 which comes free with the May/June issue of Crafts magazine.
Comment by Rebecca Skeels 11 hours ago

http://ccskills.org.uk/careers/advice/article/harriet-vine-tatty-de...

Harriet Vine, Tatty Devine artistic director

Harriet co-founded Tatty Devine, now an acclaimed handmade fashion jewellery brand. Their laser-cut plastic collections have featured in a number of high fashion magazines and London Fashion Week.

Harriet Vine (left) and Rosie Wolfendon (right) set up Tatty Devine together after meeting at art college.Harriet Vine (left) and Rosie Wolfendon (right) set up Tatty Devine together after meeting at art college.

Hometown?

I'm from Rochester in Kent.

What job do you do?

I am artistic director and cofounder at Tatty Devine.

Tatty Devine has been going since 1999, when Rosie Wolfenden and I set it up.

We design and make handmade laser-cut acrylic jewellery and accessories. We put out two seasonal collections per year, and we're also known for our name necklaces.

We have two London shops, in Brick Lane and Covent Garden.

How did you get started in jewellery?

I've always been making stuff, not just jewellery, ever since I was little.

 

"We found bin bags full of leather samples. We made accessories, set up a market stall, and made some money from it."

 

I used to go to boot fairs a lot, and still do. I'd buy things like wooden bottle openers and make them into necklaces. I was always finding things and stringing them round my neck.

Rosie and I met at art college. When we lived together, we were sharing a house full of boys in bands. They left a lot of plectrums lying around, so I used to harvest them and make them into earrings.

I was really interested in how the perception of an object would change when it was picked up from the floor and became a piece of jewellery.

One night Rosie and I found a lot of bin bags full of leather samples. We took them home, not exactly sure what they would become – but we knew it would be exciting.

We set up a market stall selling leather cuffs made from the leather we had found. When we made some money from it, we took it to a leather shop and bought some zebra print ponyskin to make more wrist cuffs with. I think that was our first proper investment that wasn’t on falafel and whisky!

We made and sold more cuffs and had a super fun time, and by Christmas we were being stocked in Whistles and Harvey Nichols.

Then a stylist saw Rosie wearing a headpiece we'd made and asked about it. She replied, 'My company make these'. The stylist turned out to be from Vogue magazine, and she asked us to bring our collection in the following week!

We didn't have a collection as such at that point, so we made stuff frantically all weekend, and it was featured in Vogue's Millennium issue.

We applied to take part in London Fashion Week, got in, and pulled out all the stops. We turned up with a collection of plated chains with pendants made from plectrums and old dart flights. There was nothing else like it there.....

Comment by Rebecca Skeels 11 hours ago

Come and see us at Art15
We will be presenting exciting recent developments to our products for Galleries, Artists and Collectors at Art15 at Olympia, London on 21 - 23 May.

http://www.artfairslondon.com/index.php/exhibiting/emerge

Artlogic is proud to be an official partner of Art15 and we look forward to seeing you there.

 

Members (76)

 
 
 

SNAG / CH Scholarship 2015

Created by

Kelly M Nye

Makers, Metalsmiths, and other Monikers.

What do you call yourself? Where do you belong in the Polarized Convocation of Jewelers?

This blog is a research-based discussion of personal inclusions in the Jewelry/Metals field and the titles and boundaries that define us as artists.

How do you define yourself and your practice?

JOIN the discussions.

Latest Activity

Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"so so so many exciting things to do http://www.londoncraftweek.com/programme?&&&&keys=&page=1"
5 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
6 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
6 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"The second Make Your Mark student event at Goldsmiths’ Hall proved a resounding success. Held at Goldsmiths’ Hall over two days (Friday 17 and Saturday 18, April) more than 700 students attended. The two days were action-packed with a…"
6 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"Don't miss this fantastic event, open to anyone with an interest in hallmarking or precious metals on Friday 22 May. There will be an expert talk on the hallmarking process and history of our assay office, the oldest assay office in the UK, an…"
6 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
6 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
6 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"THE HERE AND NOW Corinne Julius looks at jewellery at…"
6 hours ago
Glen Guarino posted a blog post

Demonstrations by Furniture Maker Glen Guarino at Lie-Nielson Tool Event

I am going to demo a process I use to ebonize furniture at the Lie-Nielson Tool Event in Peters Valley Craft Center, 19 Kuhn Rd, Layton, NJ 07851. The event will be Friday May 8, 2015 from 10am-6pm and Saturday May 9 from 10am-5pm. Admission is free and open to the public. Directions to Peters Valley https://www.petersvalley.org/html/directions.cfmI will go through the stages of ebonizing and show samples of the…See More
7 hours ago
Glen Guarino liked Peter Antor's photo
7 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
11 hours ago
Rebecca Skeels commented on Rebecca Skeels's group The Association for Contemporary Jewellery
"Come and see us at Art15We will be presenting exciting recent developments to our products for Galleries, Artists and Collectors at Art15 at Olympia, London on 21 - 23 May. http://www.artfairslondon.com/index.php/exhibiting/emerge Artlogic is proud…"
11 hours ago

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