Group projects are a cornerstone of Collaboration events, serving to draw together makers from disparate disciplines and media. At Echo Lake the major group project is a print project: linoleum blocks about 58mm square (2 3/8") are individually carved and then arranged and printed in groups. 

This is a little challenging for a maker of 3D objects - my drawings are all directed to developing concepts of form - not graphically strong images suitable for linocuts. I filled pages of my notebook with little abstract drawing of place and eventually settled on a mnemonic drawing of the view from my studio back in Australia.

In the experimental spirit of the event, I decided not to carve my block with the supplied tools, lino carving being much like carving wood without the complications of grain. Instead I marked my block with dapping punches. I had been introduced to these beautiful graduated sets of ball-headed jewelers punches at a collaboration in Australia. I was a little nervous about the outcome, but ending up being quite pleased. The prints had an interesting evolution as the compression of the lino changed slightly with each journey through the press.

This was a welcome place to start, to focus on a making process, and a way to meet many of the other collaborators. Working individually but in a collective space, without the negotiation needed to collaborate fully is an easy step on the journey from solo studio maker to collaborator.

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I could cry, I want to be there so badly!
Ross, could you go into the selection or application process for ECHO for us? I am pretty sure lots of crafthausers would like to know more about that. Thanks and ENJOY!

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Tales From the Tool Box - A Crafthaus Online Exhibition

Diana Greenwood
‘There is always one moment in childhood…’

Mantel Box 230 x 330 x 45 mm

Mantel Box in Cherry wood with a hinged glass door, containing a silver vessel marked ‘drink me’, marbles, sweets and found objects

A piece about childhood, forgotten toys, favorite stories and the loss of innocence as the future beckons, inspired by ‘Garden of Love’ by William Blake.

Image Credit: Diana Greenwood

www.diana-greenwood.com

View the new CRAFTHAUS online exhibition (October 24-November 24, 2014)

Tales from the Tool Box - Chapter 1

Curated by Mark Fenn - Studiofenn, UK

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A modern metalsmith/metal artist can be found working in traditional metals as well as in nontraditional materials. The designs can range from the classic to the extravagant, and the techniques can either be centuries old or decidedly current.

The wide range of expression preferences, design options, materials, and processes has lead within our field to unfavorable misconceptions, misunderstandings and in some cases even outright disdain between artists. Can the metal and jewelry field overcome its division and send out a much-needed signal?

We appreciate and respect our historical past and acknowledge that current materials have a rightful place in jewelry/object making!

DETAILS on exhibition premise, call for artists, submission guidelines.....

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