A Pre-launch Intro to the SNAG/Crafthaus 2013 Season

My name is Rebecca Rose.
I make Sculpturings- a hybrid of sculpture and jewelry: www.sculpturings.com

 

Just a quick hello to the SNAG & Crafthaus communities introducing myself, my work, and the two main themes I intend to cover in the 2013/ 2014 blog.

 

But before I jump right in to the main topics, here’s a backstory to give some understanding of where I come from and what I aim to do- and most importantly, how all of you fit into that big picture.

 

Like many of us, early on in college I saw the similarities of foundry sculpture and metalsmithing jewelry. In both cases I started with an idea, and transformed that idea from concept to reality out of wax and burnable objects. In both cases I plaster coated the original, kiln fired it, melted metal, and poured it into the negative space.

 

I saw that sculpture and jewelry were the same, interchangeable.

 

The only difference between the two: one form of art is heavier, more apt to be immobile and decorative, and the other form is smaller, more apt to be mobile and functional. What was missing was a way to bridge the two. And over the years I saw I’m not the only one who wants to bridge that gap and dispel myths that jewelry is less than, instead of equal to, other mediums accepted as a fine art.

 

The new movement: Bridgism.

 

Georgia O'Keeffe wearing an Alexander Calder brooch, 1950.

 

Bridgism describes bridging the gap between art that’s considered craft and art that’s considered fine art- blurring the line so the line doesn't exist or matter. Equalling the playing field, where both are equally recognized and revered.

 

Bridgism summarizes the current crossover in the worldwide art scene. Applied artists are getting their work shown in fine art shows and galleries, and established fine artists are dabbling in, and experimenting with the applied arts. As an example, check out Claire Oliver Gallery's "Beyond Bling: The Artist as Jeweler" show in NYC, November 2012. More galleries are following suit, opening their arms, doors, and collecting clientele to jewelers. I plan on showcasing some of the artists involved in this crossover in upcoming entries.

 

The resurgence of makers today is reminiscent of the Victorian Arts and Crafts movement of the 1980’s, the Pasadena Arts and Crafts movement of the 1920’s, the German Bauhaus movement of the 1930’s, and even the American Arts and Crafts movement during the 1960’s. You fit into the big picture because you’re a maker within this movement, and this movement has the ability to change the mainstream collective view so jewelry is accepted as a conduit of high fine art.

 

Salvador Dali created 39 jewelry pieces between 1941-1970.

 
About those topics...
In the manner of Rocky & Bullwinkle's Fractured Fairy Tales, here's a little teaser: Stay tuned for next week's entry "A Tale of Two Topics" or "Around the Art World in 13 Months".

 

See you next week!
-Rebecca
_________________________________
Why don't we be friends?
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Sculpturings Website

 

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