New Directions: Powder Metallurgy (Metal Clay) in a Sheet Metal World Part 2

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New Directions:  Powder Metallurgy (Metal Clay) in a Sheet Metal World Part 2

This exhibition embraces the unique personality that metal clay brings in the form of jewelry, vessels, functional and decorative objects.

 

July 17 - August 17, 2011

Members: 26
Latest Activity: May 31, 2012

New Directions:  Powder Metallurgy (Metal Clay) in a Sheet Metal World Part 2 is the second part of a multi-segmented exhibition celebrating the unique personality that metal clay brings in the form of jewelry, vessels, functional and decorative objects. New Directions:  Powder Metallurgy (Metal Clay) in a Sheet Metal World Part 1 was featured from April 14 - May 14, 2011 here on Crafthaus and can still be viewed at:  http://crafthaus.ning.com/group/powdermetallurgypart1.  A print exhibition of both Powder Metallurgy exhibitions will be on view at the Metal Clay World Conference held in Chicago July 14 -17, 2011.

 

An expanded collection of images will be released in an exhibition catalog titled, New Directions:  Powder Metallurgy (Metal Clay) in a Sheet Metal World

 to be unveiled at the Metal Clay World Conference in July, 2011.

 

Nisa Smiley

Franklin, ME

Physalis (Chinese Lantern Plant) Earrings

Fine silver metal clay, sterling silver, hand blown hollow glass bead (interior)

 

"I first laid my hands on PMC over a decade ago, and ever since I have been spell-bound!  the possibilities continue to prove limitless, and I enjoy marrying my traditional metalsmithing skills with my precious metal clay work, carrying the level of my work to places that still pleasantly surprise and inspire me.  What more could I ask for from my materials?!"   

 

Lesley Messam

West Sussex, England

Up & Over Interchangeable Ring

40mm (h)

Fine silver metal clay, nut and bolt, lampwork bead

Photographer:  Abby Johnston

 

"I’m a partner in a tool shop with little to inspire me.  Since discovering metal clay I have opened the Bead Cellar and built a teaching studio to inspire and help my students. More importantly I have embraced my creative side to design unique bespoke jewellery and given myself the incentive to continue." 

 

 

Linda Kaye-Moses
Dalton, MA

Babl

Large pendant: 8.5cm x 4cm x 12mm

Cone pendant:  4cm x 2.5 cm

Fine silver metal clay, sterling silver cable, 22k gold, vitreous enamel, lapis lazuli

Photographer:  Evan J. Soldinger

 

"Although my work prior to using metal clay was characterized by textural surfaces, coloured gemstones, and patination, my use of metal clay has allowed me to explore even more complex surface treatments, and to investigate the use of vitreous enamels, adding additional colour to my work. I have enjoyed the ease with which the use of metal clay leads me to create more complex forms and designs, including hollow and extruded forms. And, finally, metal clay inspired me to accept the offer to write my book on metal clay beads.

 

 

 

Barbara Becker Simon

Cape Coral, FL

Big Links

Approx. 20” long, biggest link is 2” X 2” x 3/8”

The hollow, fine silver clay interlocking links are fired as one unit.  The terminals were torch fired onto stainless cable using metal clay paste in lieu of solder.

 

  "Perusing a jewelry magazine in 1995, I read an article about a material that behaved like clay and consisted of microscopic particles of pure, precious metal.  My jaw dropped open, my brain began to race, calculating the possibilities...  For 25 years before this, I pursued a career making one-of-a-kind jewelry.  I was no stranger to high-karat gold, diamonds, emeralds and all techniques that combine them.  I hammered, I sawed, I filed, I soldered and I cast.  But this metal clay was something revolutionary and impossibly magical!"

 

Susan Ellenton

Victoria, BC, Canada

Bicone Bead

2” x .9”

Fine silver clay, hollow construction, yeast grown on surface, slip layered on, water etched

 

"Metal clay has brought me back to the bench, and transformed my working methods.  I'm much more more process-oriented now and I love how that fits with life as a whole. Currently, I'm immersed in developing metal clay extrusion techniques."

 

Nicola Callow

Worcester, U.K.

Aether

35mm x 55mm

Fine silver metal clay, metal clay findings, abalone shell, fine silver wire, handmade fine silver chain, polymer clay

 

"I’m inspired by the artistry of ancient cultures, which is as rich in physical depth and texture as it is in symbolism. Metal clay offers endless texture and carving possibilities, it’s so immediate and versatile. It’s also great for making decorative elements in mixed media work ~  try it!"

 

Lisa Barth

Atlanta, GA

Solar Flare

2 1/8” x 1 3/8”

Fine silver metal clay, fine silver bezel, natural ammonite fossil cabochon

 

"Metal clay blew open the doors of a whole new world for me as an artist.  Techniques that seemed unattainable like hollow forms, stone setting and hand carving metal were suddenly right in front of me.  My life is now a wild adventure of exploring and teaching this wonderful medium."

 

 

 

 

Celie Fago

Vermont

Triangle Box

1 1/8” x 1 ½”

Fine silver metal clay, 24K gold interior, Aura 22 gold applied to box top, five
fine silver metal clay shapes textured (both sides), dried, assembled.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emma Baird

Edinburgh, Scotland

Curved Ring

12mm wide shank

Fine silver clay, cubic zirconia

 

"In a previous life I was on a path to becoming a Financial Adviser. A timely break career break saw the re-emergence of my creative side, and as soon as I discovered metal clay I was hooked!  Shortly after I became a Senior Art Clay Instructor, introducing others to this amazing material. Now, I’m blessed for metal clay is both my passion AND profession."   

 

Mary Ann Nelson

Hemel Hempsteak, U.K.

Music Maker Bracelet

Fine silver clay, photopolymer plate texture

 

 "Working in metal clay has allowed me the freedom
to explore surface texture, the use of color in my work and imagery in
particular.  The pieces take on a life of
their own and each one has a unique story to tell."

 

Angela Baduel-Crispin

Bretagne, France

Nudibranchia Brooch-Pendant

8cm long

Fine silver metal clay, copper clay, sterling silver, sculpted, triple fired, shrink-riveted

 

 

Joy Funnell

Hastings, U.K.

Spirito di Venezia

67mm x 32mm

Fine silver metal clay, white cubic zirconia and lab rubies, fine silver wire, enamel

 

"Working with silver clay has transformed my life. It gives me a freedom to express my creativity in a way I never found in sheet materials. I am passionate about using it and teaching others about the wonders of it."

 

Gale Schlagel

Olathe, KS

New Beginnings #006

1.25” diameter

Fine silver metal clay

 

"I love the immediate responsiveness of fine silver metal clay.  It’s just me, the clay and my hands doing the talking."

 

Alice Alper-Rein

Morganville, NJ

Way Over the Rainbow - A Musical Kaleidoscope

4" tall x 2" wide

Fine silver metal clay, brass, sterling silver, dichroic glass.  The music box mechanism spins the interchangeable wheels which are viewed through the kaleidoscope mechanism. 

 

"In contrast to my metalsmithing work, I enjoy building complex, highly detailed and textured metal clay structures to completion without having to heat/solder/pickle at each join.  I enjoy experimenting with the various forms of metal clay to make them do what conventional metals can’t do, like puff and shrink."

 

 

Roxan Waluk

Delaplane, VA

Nesting  Box

Fine silver metal clay, box construction, slip painted, riveted sterling silver bail

 

"I have worked as an artist most of my life but I always dreamed of working with precious metals, gemstones and jewelry design but was deterred by the start up costs and hours of training required for traditional metalsmithing.  Metal clay has given me the opportunity to fulfill those dreams because it is relatively easy to learn the basics and economical to get started.  It has opened a whole new world up to me and has become my passion in life."

 

Pam East

Johns Creek, GA

Exuberance

46mm x 21mm x 21mm

Fine silver metal clay and pearls, hollow form construction

 

"I started out making enamel beads on copper tubing.  When I decided to make silver clay tubes for my beads, it changed my life. Beads were quickly left behind.  Exploring enameling on silver clay consumed me. Now copper clay has expanded my horizons, taking me in new directions, yet again."

 

Gordon K. Uyehara

Honolulu, HI

Dragon Tail Bracelet

1” x 7”

Fine silver clay, segments are linked by bails

 

"I don't know what I'd be doing if I hadn't discovered silver clay. Would I have found my way to working with a clay medium or to small-scale sculpting? Perhaps. However, I'm glad it didn't take years of searching as I really enjoy expressing myself with metal clay."

 

Lis-el Crowley

Windsor, CT

Drusy Love 1

2” x 2 ½”

Fine silver metal clay, titanium drusy, fine silver bezel, sterling silver


"My current focus is primarily in creating one of a kind art jewelry with fine silver, metal clay, sterling silver, my own fused glass, stones and more. I love mixing media and styles to create unique, elegant and whimsical designs. Everything I make is hand fabricated by me, though I do use commercial chains on some of my pendants."

 

Lora Hart

Venice, CA

Toolip

40mm x 28mm x 7mm

Fine silver clay, hollow construction, coral

 

"Prior to discovering metal clay at the turn of the century, I was a make up artist working in commercials and had never made a single piece of jewelry. This miraculous material changed my life completely. I started selling, teaching and eventually became a Senior Instructor with PMC Connection. Late last year (2010) I was asked to become their Artistic Advisor.  Adding traditional fabrication skills to my skill set has allowed the work to evolve and I’m excited to see where the muse
will lead me next."

 

Dyanne Welch

San Antonio, TX

Forget Me Never

16” long

Fine silver metal clay, dry construction chain, hand sculpted and carved flowers, natural garnets

 

Noortje Meijerink

The Netherlands

Lady Bird

13” high

Body is bronze clay hollow construction, extremities are copper clay


"Metal clay gave my porcelain the wings to fly away with and took me along for the ride! It took me to the USA and helped me to make lots of friends.  Not only did it gave a boost to my inspiration, it enhanced my passion for experimentation and combination."

 

Laurie Yoder

Seymour, TX

The Meeting

Pendant 3 ¼” x 1 5/8”

Fine silver metal clay, sterling silver chain, 24k Keum-boo, gemstone and resin

 

"I worked in polymer clay for a short time years ago, but turn to metalsmithing in
the early 90’s.  When I tried metal clay for the first time, I immediately fell in love it, enjoying this new art material better then I liked fabricating with hard metals."

 

Vickie Hallmark

Austin, TX

Birdwatching bracelet

8” long

Fine silver clay, vitreous enamel on glass, Argentium sterling

 

"As a research scientist who spent years studying the interaction of light with single crystal silver surfaces, I find it ironic that I now spend my days exploring color and silver from an artistic point of view."

 

Gail Lannum

Cleveland, OH

Untitled 1

2” diameter

Bronze clay, lampwork bead by artist Angi Graham, ancient brass beads and quartz bead

 

"Bronze metal clay has had a major impact on my work.  It has inspired me to study ancient cultures, art, and languages so I can create pieces that that have an archeological feel to them."

 

Rachel Kranzberg Miller

St. Louis, MO

Silver Crown Mezuzah

4 ½” x ¾”

Fine silver metal clay


"I consider metal clay a permanent, serious medium.  When you fire a piece of metal clay it becomes solid silver, it automatically makes your piece more important and relevance.  I started making objects in metal clay based on my Jewish faith because the medium allowed me to make modern interpretations of antiquities."

 

Lorrene Baum-Davis

Placerville, CA

Legends #1

Fine silver metal clay, purple (3mm) purple cubic zirconia channel set in carved metal clay


"Metal clay’s malleability has expanded my artistic skills beyond my goldsmithing creativity. Forming, filing, sanding, adding, subtracting and stone setting make this medium my bliss."

 

Julie Beucherie

Seattle, WA

Queen for a Day

1.5 x 3”

Fine silver metal clay, fine silver wire, sterling silver, ocean jasper, natural sapphire

 

"Metal clay has liberated me from the torch and other traditional metal-smithing techniques.  As we’re all discovering, the techniques available to us in this medium keep evolving, and I find that very exciting as I continue to push myself and grow as a sculptural jewelry making artisan."

 

Donna Penoyer

Pittsburgh, PA

Stop Look Listen

From the Talisman series

Pendant 3 3/8” x 3”

Fine silver metal clay with rotating glass dial that sequentially reveals glass images (HIV, smallpox, anthrax), sterling silver.  Glass artist, Darlene Durrwachter Rushing.


"Before metal clay, I had a yearning to make meaningful jewelry but hadn’t found the medium that would help me develop my voice. I did not choose metal clay as a shortcut through that exploration but was drawn to it with a fierce affinity and vision. Now my talismans are emerging."

 

 

Jackie Truty

Oak Lawn, IL

Changing Seasons

7” x 9” x 1”

Fine silver metal clay, resin

 

"Working in metal clay has had a liberating affect on my art.  It has given me the ability to work dimensionally, to "see" around the corners of my art.  It has eliminated the boundary between creativity and accomplishment."

 

Evelyn Pelati Dombkowski

Windsor, CT

Art Deco Bracelet with Detailed Back

7.5" x 3/4"

Fine silver metal clay built and fired in one piece, sterling silver jump ring

 

"Metal clay has made it possible for me to bring my silver jewelry design ideas to life by teaching me to think about depth, texture, positive and negative spaces. I enjoy the process of designing, planning and creating in metal clay."

 

About the Curators

Susan Breen Silvy

Kansas City, MO

Industrial Chic

2 ¼” diameter

Fine silver metal clay, dry construction, sandblasted stacked interior plates, amethyst, sterling silver chain

 

Susan Breen Silvy has been a professional artist for almost 20 years.   A graduate of the University of Central  Missouri with a degree in Public Relations and Graphics, she went on to work as an account executive in the advertising industry.  She served as President of the International Society of Glass Beadmakers form 2002 to 2005 and currently teaches techniques in metal clay at the Kansas City Art Institute.

First introduced to metal clay in it’s infancy in 1999, she chose to make it her primary focus in 2006.  She has attained Level 1 in the Metal Clay Masters Registry .  Using her knowledge from working with several different media, her current work combines the soft lines obtained with metal clay along with the crisp lines achieved through sandblasting and dry construction techniques. 

The self-taught artist has been  published in numerous publications including 500 Beads,  the 2010, 2009 and 2008 PMC Guild Annual and The Art of Metal Clay .  She was the recipient of awards for her glass work including first place awards in both Lapidary Journal’s Bead Arts Awards in 2003,  Bead and Button’s Bead Dreams 2002 Awards and  judges choice in the 2002 and 2001 Gleaming Treasures national exhibition.  Her work can be found in the permanent collection of the Missouri Governors Mansion, the Bead Museum in Washington, D.C. and the Bead Museum in Glendale, Arizona.  Her work has also been exhibited extensively in juried and invitational exhibitions nationally and at the 2009 Silver Accessories Exhibition at the National At Center in Tokyo, Japan.

 

Christine Norton

Catharpin, VA

Pod Trio

Pendant 3" x 1"

Fine silver metal clay, handwoven sterling silver chain maille

 

For years Christine Norton was primarily focused in fiber arts but a jewelry class over ten years ago changed her focus and she been a jewelry artist ever since.  Certified in  metal clay in 2003, this has been her primary medium ever since.   Her metal clay designs have appeared in the PMC Guild Annual in 2009 and 2010 and The Art of Metal Clay Calendar in 2009, 2010 and 2011.  Her work has also been modeled by Alison Starling on the ABC Morning News in Washington, D.C. as well as Molette Green on WJLA Morning News in Rosslyn, VA. 

 

About the Jurors

 

Ann Davis

Springfield, VA
Spoon

Fine silver metal clay, Keum-boo

 

 Ann Davis is an internationally recognized metal clay, electroforming and award winning lampwork glass artist and teacher.  A professional metalsmith for over 40 years, Davis has been shown in numerous national and international exhibitions.  Her tutorial articles have appeared in such publications as Lapidary Journal/ Jewelry Artist. She served two terms as Vice President of the International Society of Glass Beadmakers and is presently the President of the Northern Virginia PMC Guild Chapter.  Her work has appeared in numerous publications including Art Jewelry Today a compilation of the best in contemporary art jewelry, Bead & Button, Fusion, Metal Clay Artist and many glass bead making books. In 2010 she opened her teaching studio La Ruche Davis, where she has a Visiting Artist Masters Program that brings in some of the most accomplished artists in the contemporary jewelry field.

 

Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

Merrickville, ON, Canada
Ella

Fine silver clay

 

Jeannette Froese LeBlanc is the Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of Metal Clay Artist Magazine.  Jeannette began working with metal clay in 2001 and it quickly pushed pottery right out of her studio!  Jewelry making and metal clay has been her artistic passion since.  She has always been involved in artistic endeavors and is the consummate teacher.  In addition to teaching from her studio, Jeannette has 20 year experience teaching art at the middle school and college levels.  She now finds that the magazine is an extension of her classroom and studio.

 

 

Gwynne Rukenbrod

Asheville, NC
 

Gwynne Rukenbrod began her career as a glass artist in Chaing Mai, Thailand in 1998.  When she became the Assistant Curator of the National Heisey Glass Museum in Newark, OH in 1999, she was in charge of performing hot glass demonstrations for tours.  As she learned to blow hot glass, she also explored a variety of other glass mediums.  In July of 1999, she became the Studio Director of a non-profit glass art facility in Columbus, Ohio called Glass Axis.  It was this job that really launched her love for blown and fused glass art.  As an arts executive, Gwynne has served as the Executive Director for the Short North Neighborhood Foundation, Art Curator for The Works, Executive Director of the International Society of Glass Beadmakers, and the Curator of Fine Craft at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft.  Currently Gwynne has recently relocated to Asheville, NC to serve as the Executive Director of HandMade in America.  As a craft artist and arts administrator, Gwynne is dedicated to sustaining the culture of craft and improving economies through creative community development.

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Comment by Christine Norton on August 10, 2011 at 2:24pm

Hi Christi, the $15 you paid earlier was to pay the designer - not to purchase a copy of the catalog.  To purchase a copy of the catalog, please go here:

http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/2302262

Also - congratulations on the Art Jewelry article!!  Great article!!

Comment by Christi Anderson on August 10, 2011 at 2:06pm

When can I expect my copy?? I've been waiting patiently and I see others have theirs?

Comment by Christine Norton on August 1, 2011 at 3:06pm

What would you do with two copies?!  Why, make one a gift for someone special!  :-)

Comment by Julie Beucherie on August 1, 2011 at 1:45pm

Ah.  Thanks for the clarification Christine.  I guess I don't need to be piggish.  What would I do with two copies anyway?  ;^>

Comment by Christine Norton on August 1, 2011 at 1:28pm

Hi Julie - The $15 fee you paid earlier was actually to pay the designer - not to purchase a copy of the catalog.  So the one copy you received via your order through Blurb is correct.  Thanks for participating - it is a gorgeous catalog because of all of the great artists who submitted their beautiful work!  Christine

Comment by Julie Beucherie on August 1, 2011 at 12:31pm

Very Cool!  Hey Christine, it's not huge deal but am wondering if I should expect my second copy of the catalog at a later date?  I paid for a catalog several months ago, and then bought another copy a few weeks ago.  I received the copy I purchased a few weeks ago approximately one week ago.  I should have received two copies...  It's a great little book!  I'd love to have my second copy.  ;^>

Comment by Angela Baduel-Crispin on August 1, 2011 at 10:30am

Thanks to you guys, Christine !

I received my copies and the book is simply wonderful ! So proud to be among such a group ! Thank you !

Comment by Christine Norton on August 1, 2011 at 10:04am

I checked the sales page and it is a little hard to read as it is a bar graph but it looks like a little over 100 catalogs have been sold so far which gives CERF+ a profit of nearly $550 to date.  Thanks everyone for the support! 

Comment by Mary Ann Nelson on July 29, 2011 at 8:45am

My copies arrived today -it is a beautiful compendium of work and it is an honor to have been  included! It is also great to know that the proceeds will be going such a worthy cause as CERF.

Thanks to Christine and Susan!

Comment by Linda Kaye-Moses on July 28, 2011 at 7:43am

Hey there Susan and Christine, My catalogues arrived last week and I forgot to say THANK YOU all over again. This is a great encyclopedia of work being made currently... a little gem of an archive. Will you keep us posted on how many are sold and how much $$$ is going to CERF, please.

Linda

 

Members (24)

 
 
 

A modern metalsmith/metal artist can be found working in traditional metals as well as in nontraditional materials. The designs can range from the classic to the extravagant, and the techniques can either be centuries old or decidedly current.

The wide range of expression preferences, design options, materials, and processes has lead within our field to unfavorable misconceptions, misunderstandings and in some cases even outright disdain between artists. Can the metal and jewelry field overcome its division and send out a much-needed signal?

We appreciate and respect our historical past and acknowledge that current materials have a rightful place in jewelry/object making!

Arriving at this message is the goal of this traveling exhibition opening at the SNAG conference in Boston 2015, Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco, CA - Aug 19 - Sept 20, 2015, Equinox Gallery, San Antonio, TX - Oct 16 - Nov 15, 2015, Baltimore Jewelry Center, Baltimore, MD - Dec 11, 2015 - Jan 08, 2016, Brooklyn Metal Works, Brooklyn, NY - Feb 5 - Mar 4, 2016.

DETAILS on exhibition premise, call for artists, submission guidelines.....

Rachel and Brigitte will be appearing on the wonderful Jay Whaley Metalsmith Benchtalk Radio Show, talking about the Co:Operation Garnish project, how they came up with the idea, what the project is about and the plans moving forward.

The radio show will be LIVE on air September 25, 2014 @ 6PM EST / 3 PM Pacific.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/whaleystudios

Listeners can call in during the show via phone, skype, or directly connect via the blog talk website.

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