Craft, Collaboration and crossing continents

Information

Craft, Collaboration and crossing continents

Blogging the journey from my studio cross continents to international collaborations, and the ripples and reflections back into my practice.

Members: 67
Latest Activity: Apr 2, 2013

My conundrum: studio craft is essentially a self-directed solo affair. The many hours spent each day, in the studio, by myself, is what my work needs. Work suffers if there are too many voices, too many hands. But creative breakthroughs in my studio practice are often the ongoing reflections from working collectively, becoming creatively immersed with others, collaborating in a cross-disciplinary cross-media community of makers. 

This blog explores the process of journeying from the safe, solo studio space across the world to engage in several international collaborations, and to examine their impacts on my studio practice.

Discussion Forum

Only the Echoes Remain

Started by Ross Annels Jul 1, 2012. 0 Replies

And then, it’s over. The pieces are gathered up for photography, tools are packed, and workshops cleaned. All that remains is the auction and the goodbyes.Members of the public are invited to share a meal and attend the auction - a few notable collectors are in the audience, as well as friends and relatives of the artists. The auction is a great success - a fabulous pair of auctioneers who are associated with the Center for Art in Wood drive the processes with humour and skill. Two favourite moments: early in the auction they drive a mock bidding war between non-existent buyers, taking a piece that had raised a tiny opening bid to over $6000, much confusion and laughter ensues. And a truly poignant moment, a young woman buying her first piece at an auction, made by a friend from timber donated by her family, is moved to the point of (private) tears by her successful bid. It is a rare and precious thing to make work that embodies such strong connection. It came from the lake - some of…Continue

The Pointy end of Echo Lake

Started by Ross Annels. Last reply by Brigitte Martin Jun 29, 2012. 1 Reply

There is a tipping point in every collaboration event - when the mood changes from the playful “maybe” and “how about” to the realisation that there isn’t much time left.“We have to get these pieces done in time for photography and the auction”: Is there enough time for the glue/paint to dry, How can we do this that we didn’t really think through in our playfulness, …Continue

Nakashima Studios

Started by Ross Annels Jun 24, 2012. 0 Replies

One of the great joys of attending a collaboration event is the generous, talented and creative people you meet. This post is a personal thank you to Miriam Carpenter, one of the go-to people of the collaboration, who successfully worked on many too many projects, including our lamp project!Miriam with Mark SfirriMiriam CarvingMiriam is an industrial design graduate of RISD and works with Mira Nakashima as a designer at the Nakashima Studios.George Nakashima stands out as a very significant figure in the development of the studio furniture landscape. Many furniture makers have found inspiration in his work and lifestyle. Nakashima’s work…Continue

Getting Earnest at Echo

Started by Ross Annels. Last reply by Ross Annels Jun 24, 2012. 3 Replies

Things have begun in earnest now - well at least as earnest as they get at a collaboration event.Harvey wore a carefully selected non-matching socks every dayHumour plays a big role in collaboration, building relationships and generating playful projects.An oarsome bench takes shape…Continue

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Craft, Collaboration and crossing continents to add comments!

Comment by Pat Morrow on March 14, 2012 at 11:58am

I love your thoughts about 'place' Ross. Attached is a photo of one of my thoughts on place. The world is so much bigger than us. When do you start your trip?

Comment by Sabiha Mujtaba on March 2, 2012 at 10:40am

Hi Ross, Looking forward to watching your journey in the States.I have admired your work greatly. I'm in midst of my first collaborative experience headed by metal-smith Jen Townsend (NY) and painter Sheena graham-George (UK) It is an invigorating process across cultures and continents. For me the commissioned work I do for customers/clients can feel collaborative (with parameters) that do open directions beyond the project.

Comment by Tom Supensky on February 1, 2012 at 4:44pm

Pardon my ignorance, but what is a PM?   My email is supensky@gforcecable.com

It might be best to commute that way.

Cheers,

Tom 

Comment by The Justified Sinner on February 1, 2012 at 4:17pm

Certainly, Tom! Send me a PM and I will put you in touch with her.

Comment by Tom Supensky on February 1, 2012 at 9:09am

Some valid points for a collaboration...it can open new directions and one can learn new techniques...why not?  

We go to Bristol at least once a year.  We'll look up Lisa.

Tom 

Comment by The Justified Sinner on February 1, 2012 at 3:24am

Yay! Excellent idea for a group. I LOVE collaborations and have several people I return to time and time again, notably Lisa Stevens, a ceramics artist in Bristol who has worked with me on several of my "big" pieces. She created the mushrooms in "A Forest", the skull on one of the "Four Cocktail Rings of the Apocalypse" and one of her test samples inspired me to make a homage to her in "The Mysterious Adventure of Lady Stevens".

The other person I like to work with is Dee Wilder, who works in polymer clay. She made the bird-skulls on "Ceremonial Pendant for Sepulchrave, 76th Earl of Groan" and "Richard III".

All of these photographs are on my page of Crafthaus.

For me, a collaboration allows me to work with materials that I don't have the skills or interest in using and the collaborator gets to see their work used in, perhaps, a new context.

Comment by Tom Supensky on January 31, 2012 at 4:47pm

Collaboration has a number of implications.  For most artists, the idea of collaborating detracts from personal directions.  The best you can be comes from within.  Nonetheless, there can be times when working with others on a project has its advantages.  Collaboration can inspire rather than influence.  Combining the skills of a number of persons can add to the final result of an art object.  In ceramic art there has been a number of instances where one person makes the form and another applies the decoration, glaze, etc.

   Crossing continents opens yet another possibility for the growth of an artist.  My experiences in Germany, England, Korea, and Australia has given me valuable insight as to where my own work might head.  In a sense, the influence of other parts of the world is a form of collaboration.  With today's open world through the media and ease of travel, this form of collaboration is more possible than ever.  This road to crossing continents and collaboration will lead to a more universal approach to art.  Is that a good thing, or is it just one of those inevitible results of the passing of time?  So much more to say, but at another time.

 

Members (61)

 
 
 

2014 Crafthaus Project Grant Recipient

Crafthaus is pleased to announce that Leisa Rich's project "Invisible:VisAble" garnered 968 votes of 2,575 total votes cast (37.59%) and is the 2014 Crafthaus Project Grant Winner.

Starting in November, we all look forward to following Leisa's crafthaus blog about her project.

Thank you to everyone who voted. Much success for all projects!

View all voting results.

Latest Activity

Ligia Rocha joined Lorena Angulo's group
Thumbnail

Behind the Brooch part 2

I am happy to share with all of you more images of wonderful brooches from artists around the word. I had so many submissions on my first call that I had to create a second part exhibition. This exhibition focuses on a side of the brooch we usually do not pay much attention to: the back side. Our first look is naturally always trained at the front, but when we do take the time to look at the back of a brooch, it will oftentimes reveal a surprising aspect for us, a delightful little secret. With…See More
6 minutes ago
Profile IconLigia Rocha, Curtis H Arima and 4 other members joined Mark Fenn - Studiofenn's group
Thumbnail

Tales From the Tool Box - Chapter One

Thank you for viewing this on-line exhibitionThis exhibition is a showcase for narrative work, with over 234 images it was decided that the exhibition would be in two parts with chapter two being on-line in January 2015I would like to personally thank all the makers who took the time to submit work for this on-line exhibition. Image left: Dauvit AlexanderTitle - "Blood Will Have Blood: A Macbeth Brooch" Image Credit: Photography by Andrew Neilson, Neilson Photography. See More
7 minutes ago
Rene Lee Henry commented on Brigitte Martin's group Crafthaus Project Grant 2014
"Congratulations! "
15 hours ago
Brigitte Martin posted a blog post

Ayasha Wood - Embroidery

Ayasha Wood is a UK based surface designer, specializing in embellishment for fashion.With an eye for color and composition, she utilizes a mixture of…See More
17 hours ago
Susan Lee Stephen shared Brigitte Martin's blog post on Facebook
19 hours ago
Susan Lee Stephen liked Brigitte Martin's blog post The Frog Museum
19 hours ago
Susan Lee Stephen shared Brigitte Martin's blog post on Facebook
19 hours ago
Susan Lee Stephen liked Brigitte Martin's blog post The Wondrous World of Nelly Saunier: Gaultier’s Plumassière Extraordinaire
19 hours ago
L. Sue Szabo commented on L. Sue Szabo's photo
Thumbnail

On the Boardwalk

"thanks stacy- that;s so nice of you to say!"
20 hours ago
Stacy Haviland commented on L. Sue Szabo's photo
Thumbnail

On the Boardwalk

"This piece is so beautiful. I look at it often."
21 hours ago
Stacy Haviland posted a status
"This group of artists are so inspiring! I was "swayed" by the beauty and personal messages of all the work"
21 hours ago
Emily Hickman liked Mark Fenn - Studiofenn's group Tales From the Tool Box - Chapter One
yesterday

A modern metalsmith/metal artist can be found working in traditional metals as well as in nontraditional materials. The designs can range from the classic to the extravagant, and the techniques can either be centuries old or decidedly current.

The wide range of expression preferences, design options, materials, and processes has lead within our field to unfavorable misconceptions, misunderstandings and in some cases even outright disdain between artists. Can the metal and jewelry field overcome its division and send out a much-needed signal?

We appreciate and respect our historical past and acknowledge that current materials have a rightful place in jewelry/object making!

DETAILS on exhibition premise, call for artists, submission guidelines.....

© 2014   Created by Brigitte Martin.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service