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Velvet da Vinci

Since 1991, Velvet da Vinci has been a leader in showcasing new developments in contemporary art jewelry and craft-based sculpture and regularly organizes exhibitions of contemporary craft.

Website: http://www.velvetdavinci.com
Location: 2015 Polk Street @ Broadway, San Francisco, CA 94109
Members: 172
Latest Activity: Sep 21

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Comment by Mike Holmes on May 31, 2013 at 7:55pm

Magic City

June 12 - July 14, 2013

Artist’s reception Friday, June 14 from 6 to 8 pm

Yi Roger Liu,

Necklace, 2010

Plaster, human hair, electroforming, gold plating

photo by the artist

Nanna Grønborg,

Twin Parts

Necklace, 2012

porcelain, glaze, silver, steel

photo by the artist

Xiaohan Vincent Ren,

Painting Fish

brooch, 2011

wood, oil painting, cooper

Comment by Mike Holmes on May 31, 2013 at 7:54pm

Magic City

June 12 - July 14, 2013

Artist’s reception Friday, June 14 from 6 to 8 pm

Exhibition catalog available

Magic City is an exhibition from recent graduates and established artists from the School of Jewellery, Birmingham, Uk. Contrary to the often-remarked grey of its post industrialism, Birmingham has become a vibrant center for the arts. The artists of this city are forging a strong presence within the art jewelry world, producing distinctive and desirable work that is offbeat, loud, quiet, funny, thoughtful, unfamiliar and unabashed.

Participating artists: Farrah Al-Dujaili, Emily Bullock, Lydia Feast, Christine Graf, Nanna Grønborg, I Ting (Heather) Ho, Zita Hsu, Christiana Joeckel, Lisa Juen, Yi (Roger) Liu, Katharina Moch, Kathryn Partington, Jo Pond, Fliss Quick, Xiaohan (Vincent) Ren, Natalie Smith, Li-Chu Wu, Wen-Miao Yeh

Jo Pond,

Tala Pan

Brooch, 2013

Repurposed baking, citrine, 18Kt gold, steel

Christiana Jöckel, a view inside

pendant, 2013

Sterling silver

photo by the artist

Natalie Smith, When?

Brooch, 2012

Clay, textile, paint, steel, sugar

photo by the artist

 

Katharina Moch,

brooch, 2011

plastic, enamel, cubic zurconia, stainless steel

photo by Elena Ruebel

I-Ting Ho, Skin Secret

Frame/Object, 2012

rubber

Comment by Mike Holmes on May 31, 2013 at 7:50pm

Magic City

June 12 - July 14, 2013

Artist’s reception Friday, June 14 from 6 to 8 pm

Lisa Juen, Demons of Age

Brooch, 2007

Mild steel, enamel, synthetic rubies, silk, stainless steel pin

photo by the artist

 

Kathryn Partington, Ethereal Serene

Brooch, 2012

Bone china, glaze, silver, stainless steel

photo by the artist

 

Li-Chu Wu, Grassland

Brooch, 2010

paper, sterling silver

photo by the artist

Lydia Feast,

Necklace, 2012

powder-coated cooper and chain

Fliss Quick, Pay Rise

Brooch, 2013

Pin board, drawing pins, in-tray, pencil, staples, silver, steel, map pins

Farrah Al-Dujaili, How queer it seems

Brooch, 2012

Cooper, enamel paint, watercolour, acrylic paint, acrylic coating

photo by the artist

Comment by Mike Holmes on May 31, 2013 at 7:46pm

Magic City

June 12 - July 14, 2013

Artist’s reception Friday, June 14 from 6 to 8 pm

Exhibition catalog available

Magic City is an exhibition from recent graduates and established artists from the School of Jewellery, Birmingham, Uk. Contrary to the often-remarked grey of its post industrialism, Birmingham has become a vibrant center for the arts. The artists of this city are forging a strong presence within the art jewelry world, producing distinctive and desirable work that is offbeat, loud, quiet, funny, thoughtful, unfamiliar and unabashed.

Participating artists: Farrah Al-Dujaili, Emily Bullock, Lydia Feast, Christine Graf, Nanna Grønborg, I Ting (Heather) Ho, Zita Hsu, Christiana Joeckel, Lisa Juen, Yi (Roger) Liu, Katharina Moch, Kathryn Partington, Jo Pond, Fliss Quick, Xiaohan (Vincent) Ren, Natalie Smith, Li-Chu Wu, Wen-Miao Yeh

Wen-Miao Yeh, The Space

Brooch, 2012

plastic, cooper, stainless steel, paint

photo by the artist

Zita Hsu, Blooms of Darkness

Necklace, 2013

photo by the artist

Emily Bullock, Moseley

Brooch, 2011

painted metal, steel pin

photo by the artist

Christine Graf, dunkles Sinngrün

brooches, 2012

copper mesh, enamel, gold, silver

photo by the artist

 

Comment by Mike Holmes on October 18, 2012 at 8:41pm

Mirror Mirror: An Exhibition in Homage to Suzy Solidor

Oct 24 through Nov 25, 2012

Curated by Jo Bloxham and Benjamin Lignel

 

Kirsten Haydon, The lure of radium 2012

Neckpiece. Enamel, small glass spheres, photoluminescent pigment, photo transfer, copper, nylon

Susanne Klemm, Anémone 2012

Necklace. Polyolefin

Mike Holmes, Suzy Fetish 2012

Object. Carved basswood, bone, brass, pearls, gesso 

Natalie Luder, Mythe de Nuit 2012

Neckpiece. Amber, Shells, Epoxy, Silver

Iris Eichenberg, Untitled 2012

Object/Mirror. steel, felt , panty hose , silk

all images credit Enrico Bartolucci, Paris

Comment by Mike Holmes on October 18, 2012 at 8:38pm

Arfabet by Hilary Pfeifer

October 24 through November 25, 2012

Artist’s reception Friday, October 26 from 6 to 8 pm

 

Arfabet is an alphabet book for dog lovers and foodies, giving a handmade insight to the 26 letters we all know and love. Like Elephabet, Arfabet will not only be a light-hearted romp through crazy kingdom--it's an opportunity for young and old to learn a few new words, dog breeds, or foods from around the world. The exhibition features all 26 original sculptures.

Comment by Mike Holmes on October 18, 2012 at 7:42pm

Mirror Mirror: An Exhibition in Homage to Suzy Solidor

Oct 24 through Nov 25, 2012

Artist’s reception Friday, Oct 26 from 6 to 8 pm

Exhibition catalog available

Curated by Jo Bloxham and Benjamin Lignel

Mirror Mirror features twenty-nine artists from fourteen countries who have studied and creatively responded to the life of Suzy Solidor. A singer, model, writer and actress, Solidor (1900 – 1983) was an intensely iconic figure of the Parisian night-life during the roaring twenties. A self-avowed sexual predator, she openly dated both, and became somewhat of a de facto advocate of sexual freedom. A sought-after model for painters, sculptors and photographers, she slowly built-up a collection of more than 200 portraits of herself which lined the walls of her clubs. Mirror Mirror is a tribute to her singular life and presents a distorted mirror of those original portraits. This exhibition was first displayed at Espace Solidor in her own village of Cagnes-Sur-Mer France. This is the only US venue.

Liesbet Bussche, Urban Jewellery: Suzy’s Charms 2012

In situ installation of a chain and six charms. Zinc

Constanze Schreiber, Suzy 2012

Neckpiece, Silver

Manon van Kouswijk, Pearls for Girls 2012

Choker. Porcelain, pigment, silk and gold

Peter Hoogeboom, Embrasses 2012

Two arm cuffs made from the opposite halves of mussel shells. Mussels, rayon thread

Seth Papac, Put on the lights 2012

Necklace. Brass

 

Comment by Mike Holmes on August 28, 2012 at 11:55pm

Jorge Castañón

September 5 - October 7 2012

Artist Reception Friday, September 7, 6 - 8 pm

Velvet da Vinci   2015 Polk Street, San Francisco

Velvet da Vinci is proud to present the first US one-person exhibition by Buenos Aires-based jeweler Jorge Castañón. One of the leading contemporary artists in Latin America, Castañón’s current work incorporates found wood and metal to create a poetic visual diary of normally overlooked debris of the city. Jorge Castañón founded his well-known school “La Nave,” 20 years ago and was featured in the Munich Schmuck 2011 Exhibition.

While working on pieces inspired by “Alice in Wonderland,” Castañón explored the emotional impact of endless holes, and hidden places away from the light. He discuses this experience in the ‘realm of doubt’ as the impetuous for his first wood pieces:

 

I wanted to talk about abundance, but suddenly knew that I was actually talking about what is not there, the void, and I found myself again making bowls, hollows filled with nothing or almost nothing.  Since then, I kept on looking for hidden places, old hiding places, crevices, containers of many things and of nothing at the same time, inhabited by silent presences.  Now I invent them, construct them, give them voice.  I rescue objects and materials that were on the way to oblivion and return to communicate a minimal story.

 

Quise hablar de la abundancia, y de pronto supe que en realidad estaba hablando de lo que no hay, del vacío, y volví a encontrarme haciendo cuencos, oquedades llenas de nada o de casi nada. Desde entonces, seguí buscando lugares ocultos, viejos escondites, hendiduras, contenedores de muchas cosas y de nada a la vez, habitados por presencias mudas. Ahora los invento, los construyo, les doy voz. Rescato objetos y materiales que iban camino al olvido y vuelven para comunicar una historia mínima.

 

Necklace: Las Madrigueras II, 2009

Parts of an old Thonet chair and linen.

51 cm x 17 cm x 2.5 cm

Brooch: To Hide in the Forest, 2010

Ebony, palo santo, toronja and wood found in the Amazonian Forest and Sterling Silver.

7.4 cm x 4.2 cm x 2.2 cm

Brooch: To Hide in the Forest, 2010

Ebony, palo santo, toronja and wood found in the Amazonian Forest and Sterling Silver.

7.4 cm x 4.2 cm x 2.2 cm
Comment by Mike Holmes on May 3, 2012 at 4:16pm

Tom Hill: Salt Cellars
May 9 through June 17, 2012
Artist's reception Friday, May 11 from 6 to 8 p.m.
Exhibition catalog available
 
Velvet da Vinci is pleased to present Salt Cellars by British artist Tom Hill. This playful flock of birds is Hill's interpretation of the traditional "salt" common to many British dining tables. The carved and painted wooden birds all open to access a pinch of salt. The bird's head will lift or hinge, and you can pluck the salt spoon incorporated into the bird's plummage and season your food. 
 
As Tom says:  "[their] eyes look up at you from the table , a lively interaction between user and object."
 
Salt and Salt Cellars, a potted history...
 
It is perhaps hard for us to imagine the importance of salt in the past. What seems to us an everyday item was, before modern refrigeration, a vital ingredient in the preservation of food. Roman soldiers were paid in salt ration, hence the words "salary" and "soldier", vegetables were seasoned to improve flavor, giving us "salad" and, perhaps most deliciously of all, pork is combined with salt to create "salami."
 
Salt was a rare and expensive commodity. Salt cellars were lockable to prevent theft and the condiment was presented on ever more elaborate vessels to emphasize the prestige of the grandest tables.
 
Kings and aristocrats commissioned extravagant salt cellars, known as "nefs" or "Great Salts." Notable Salts include the amazing example by Benvenuto Cellini depicting Ceres and Neptune and the Exeter Salt owned by Queen Elizabeth the Second, given to King Charles the Second by the City of Exeter in the hope that he would forgive the city's part in the overthrow and execution of his father (it did the trick). Nefs in the form of golden galleons and silver castles graced the richest tables, creating animated sculptural landscapes to feed both the eye and the stomach.
 
We still throw spilt salt over our shoulder to blind the devil, give salt cellars as good luck housewarming gifts and describe the most trustworthy people as "the salt of the earth."

Tom Hill, Flamingo-ish Bird

Tom Hill, Hinged Black Bird with Pink Interior

 

Tom Hill, White Pigeonish Bird

Tom Hill, Wader

Comment by Mike Holmes on May 3, 2012 at 4:09pm

WOOD

May 9 through June 17, 2012

Artist’s reception Friday, May 11 from 6 to 8 pm
Velvet da Vinci presents WOOD.  Jewelry by Twenty-Six International Artists.

 

Kenta Katakura, Ring

Katy Hackney, Brooch, Diamonds

Lina Peterson, Brooch, Bud

Julia Harrison, Brooch, Blue Belle

Thomas Gentille, Brooch

Daniel DiCaprio, Brooch, Vessel

Gustav Reyes, Bracelet, Organic Coil No. 86

 

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Tales From the Tool Box - A Crafthaus Online Exhibition

Diana Greenwood
‘There is always one moment in childhood…’

Mantel Box 230 x 330 x 45 mm

Mantel Box in Cherry wood with a hinged glass door, containing a silver vessel marked ‘drink me’, marbles, sweets and found objects

A piece about childhood, forgotten toys, favorite stories and the loss of innocence as the future beckons, inspired by ‘Garden of Love’ by William Blake.

Image Credit: Diana Greenwood

www.diana-greenwood.com

View the new CRAFTHAUS online exhibition (October 24-November 24, 2014)

Tales from the Tool Box - Chapter 1

Curated by Mark Fenn - Studiofenn, UK

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A modern metalsmith/metal artist can be found working in traditional metals as well as in nontraditional materials. The designs can range from the classic to the extravagant, and the techniques can either be centuries old or decidedly current.

The wide range of expression preferences, design options, materials, and processes has lead within our field to unfavorable misconceptions, misunderstandings and in some cases even outright disdain between artists. Can the metal and jewelry field overcome its division and send out a much-needed signal?

We appreciate and respect our historical past and acknowledge that current materials have a rightful place in jewelry/object making!

DETAILS on exhibition premise, call for artists, submission guidelines.....

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